NAMA

NAMA 2018 Mushroom Walks

Collecting forays will leave from in front of Skyline Hall.  Check your program for times and locations.
 
Collecting Foray Schedule
  Friday Saturday
Morning ½ day Silver Falls 1 Silver Falls 2&3*
Snow Peak 1 Snow Peak 2
Afternoon ½ day Silver Falls 4 Silver Falls 5
Snow Peak 3&4* Snow Peak 5
Full day South Beach 1&2* Marys Peak 1&2*
Parish Lake Road Big Meadows

South Beach 1 and 2

South Beach State Park is located on coastal dunes south of Newport Oregon. Although it is a large park, only inland portions of the park host a forested ecosystem with mycorrhizal mushrooms and areas where brush is not too dense for walking. South of the entrance road and west of the campground on Cooper Ridge Trail are the best parts of the park for foraging. Tree species are predominantly shore pine (Pinus contorta v. contorta) and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), although Pacific waxleaf myrtle (Myrica californica) can grow to tree stature. Matsutake (Tricholoma murrillianum), king boletes (Boletus edulis), chanterelles (Cantherellus roseocanus), Leccinum manzanitae, Tricholoma equestre, Amanita muscaria v. flavivolvata and various Suillus species are likely to occur here, as well as Rhizopogon truffles.

Marys Peak

Marys Peak is the highest elevation mountain in the Oregon Coast Range. The top is managed by the Siuslaw National Forest as a Special Botanical Area. The forest consists of old noble firs (Abies procera), a species that is adapted to deep snowpacks at higher elevations in Oregon. The population of noble firs on top of Marys Peak are a remnant stand from the ice ages when much of the Coast Range was covered in noble fir forests. On a clear day, the view from the top of Mary’s peak reaches from the Pacific Ocean in the west to the peaks of the Cascade Range in the East with the Willamette Valley and rolling coastal mountains in-between. The hike from the parking area to the summit is 0.65 miles and 330 feet up along a gated gravel road.

Collection Area 1 is the old growth noble fir stand through which the Meadowedge Trail (# 1325) circles. The loop is a 1.6-miles long and has a 460-foot elevation gain/loss. Although the trail itself is in good condition and has a moderate incline, off-trail can be quite steep in sections and brushy in other. However, at the top of the loop, there are more open forest floor conditions with more moderate slopes.

If participants hike to the top of the Peak first, there is then a short “Summit Trail” leading down (https://goo.gl/maps/ehpmLCHoLis) and connecting to the top of the Meadowedge Trail loop. If weather conditions preclude a view from the summit, then from the parking lot, it is only 0.3 miles and 155 feet up along the gravel road to the trailhead for the upper portion of the Meadowedge Trail. The Google URL for this Trail Head is: https://goo.gl/maps/KvC956MhM4M2

Collection Area 2 is located along the first ½ mile section of North Ridge Trail (# 1350). This section of the trail runs along a ridge where the descent is still moderate. The understory of this noble fir forest is relatively open on either side of the trail. However the area for collection is somewhat narrow (~50 ft) in parts, because the forested area along the ridge abuts a meadow on one side and a steep drop off on the other. The North Ridge Trail starts in the Northeast corner of the parking lot.

Snow Peak 1

This forest is an unlogged old-growth forest just below the summit of Snow Peak. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has designated it as an ACEC (Area of Critical Environmental Concern). The area is set aside from timber harvesting for its scientific value. Hence a survey of fungal species is perfectly in order for this management goal. The forest consists of old Douglas-fir (Psuedotsuga menziesii), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis), and noble fir (Abies procera). From the parking area, the trail takes you a short distance through a thinned forest and then enters the ACEC. As the trail continues for several hundred yards, it traverses several broad ridges with additional elevation gain as you go further along the trail. Climbing to the peak itself entails some scrambling over rocks at the end. In August, a yellowjacket ground nest was identified near these coordinates: 44.631168, -122.589538. Activity should be minor by October, but if you are allergic, bring your Epi-pen.

Snow Peak 2

This is 2nd-growth Douglas-fir forest with trees around 40 years old. The forest is relatively flat on both sides of the road with wide spots for parking. This type of forest is ideal chanterelle habitat.

Snow Peak 3 and 4

This foray site is a moist, old-growth Douglas-fir and western hemlock forest. The terrain is relatively gentle on both sides of the road over a large area. There are some understory bushes, but they are scattered. It is a beautiful example of unlogged, lower elevation forests of the Western Oregon Cascade Mountain Range. The forest at this foray location is large enough that it could be used for two half day forays by asking participants to stay on one side of the road one day and the other side of the road the second day.

Snow Peak 5

This is 2nd-growth Douglas-fir forest with trees around 40 years old. The forest is relatively flat on both sides of the road with wide spots for parking. This type of forest is ideal chanterelle habitat.

Silver Falls 1 - Rackett Ridge

Rackett Ridge Trail is easy and traverses a beautiful old-growth Douglas-fir (Psuedotsuga menziesii) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) forest. The site has little understory vegetation and is ideal mushroom foraging ground. Silver Falls is at lower elevation, so might be drier than Snow Peak foray sites. There is no hunting allowed in State Parks.

Silver Falls 2 - Horse Loop

This foray site is a mature Douglas-fir and western hemlock forest. Easy walking areas with little understory brush are found in the south half of the road loop for the Howard Creek Horse Camp and south across the road from the loop. If the campground is closed at the time of the foray, camp sites could also be searched, but if there are campers there, they should not be disturbed, especially any horses. Silver Falls is at lower elevation, so it might be drier than Snow Peak foray sites. There is no hunting allowed in State Parks.

Silver Falls 3 - Buck Trail

This foray site is a mature Douglas-fir and western hemlock forest. See the map “SilverFallsMapForaySites.jpeg” for how to get to the foray portion of the Buck Trail. Follow signs for the “Buck Mtn. Loop.” Most of the portion of the trail leading up to this collection area has too much understory brush to foray off the trail. But, about ¼ of a mile in from the campground, as the trail dips a bit into a minor drainage, the understory opens up on either side of the trail for some distance along the trail. Silver Falls is at lower elevation, so it might be drier than Snow Peak foray sites. There is no hunting allowed in State Parks.

Silver Falls 4 - Smith Creek

Smith Creek Trail runs through a rare and beautiful example of low-elevation, old-growth Douglas-fir/western hemlock forest found in the western Cascade Mountain foothills. The collection area is about 0.2 miles along the trail from the parking lot. Look for an old, moss-covered wooden sign post with a black & white equestrian trail map (44.844452, -122.647739). The foray area is uphill (away from the creek) from this point. There is some elevation gain and coarse woody debris on the ground but otherwise few shrubs. Silver Falls is at lower elevation, so it might be drier than Snow Peak foray sites. There is no hunting allowed in State Parks.

Silver Falls 5 - Upper Smith Creek

Smith Creek Trail runs through a rare and beautiful example of low-elevation, old-growth Douglas-fir/western hemlock forest found in the western Cascade Mountain foothills. The collection area starts about 0.5 miles in from the trailhead after the trail crosses Smith Creek, bends sharply to the left and climbs about 150 feet in elevation. The collection area begins on the right (uphill from the trail) at a yellow mileage marker post. This post reads “1 mile” on the opposite side (referring to mileage from the other trailhead). The collection area continues on the right-hand side another 0.1 or more miles as the trail comes to the crest of the ridge and bends to the right along the ridge. To avoid slopes, hike to the ridge to start foraying along the trail.Silver Falls is at lower elevation, so it might be drier than Snow Peak foray sites. There is no hunting allowed in State Parks.

Parish Lake Road

The forest at this foray location is more diverse than at any of the other foray locations and different stand ages are available to explore (less than 20 years old, 40-60 years old, and old-growth). Tree species include Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis), noble fir (Abies procera), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), western white pine (Pinus monticola), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii), western red cedar (Thuja plicata), Alaska yellow cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), western chinkapin (Castanopsis chrysophylla), and red alder (Alnus rubra). Huckleberries (Vaccinium species) and bear grass (Xerophyllum tenax) can be found in the understory, but for the most part the site does not have much brush due to the dense canopy. The 310 Road crosses a creek within 20 yards providing some riparian habitat where King boletes might be found if conditions are otherwise dry. On a clear day, Three Finger Jack can be seen to the west from the parking lot.

Big Meadows

This foray location is an old-growth Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) stand, This habitat is fairly rare in the Oregon Cascades and often rich in fungal species. Other minor tree species include Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), Douglas-fir (Psuedotsuga menziesii), and grand fir (Abies grandis). Engelmann spruce prefers low, moist locations on the landscape, so this site is more likely to have early mushroom fruiting. Good habitat is located for 0.2 miles or more, on both sides of the road, both directions from the parking spot.